British Connection? Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Edit Profile

Zodiackiller.com Message Board » General Zodiac Discussion » British Connection? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seagull
Username: Seagull

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 2:33 pm:   

This is an answer to George's question in the Possible Victims/CJB/Timex thread. These are the British connections I have found. Take copies of the Dripping Pen card and the Dragon card, place them side by side in the order that they were sent. The largest objects in each card are the pen and the dragon. They form a rebus of the term Pendragon.

I think that the dots in the "gull-wing" symbol on the Halloween card are similar to the constellation Corvus. Corvus being a raven or crow. We refer to the symbol as being "gull-winged", how about it being a raven? Corvus is associated with two other constellations. One is Crater which going by my book "Star's and Planets" looks just like the upside-down "K" in the ink blotches at the end of the Exorcist letter. It represents a cup or chalice. In looking up Crater on the internet I found it didn't look so much like the one in my book. I have tried to use actual books for reference. If there is one thing I can be certain of with this case it's that Z did not have the internet to use as a reference tool! Both the Raven and the cup/chalice as well as the Pendragon remind me of King Arthur. The third constellation in the group is Hydra, the water snake.

Another British connection would be in the St. Donna card sent to Donna Lass's sister. I equate St. Donna to St. Donald. He was from Scotland and had nine daughters. There are many natural features in the UK that are called "The Nine Maidens" said to be named after his daughters. A notable feature being a well in Forfarshire, Scotland where St. Donald was from.

These are just my observations for a British connection, whether they were intended by the writer, I don't know.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 6:47 pm:   

I appreciate the input, Seagull.

Of those who believe Zodiac an UNSUB (ie. aren't biased in any direction), and who know the case and can stick to definite victims and case facts, do any have an opinion on the tired, forced theory that there is a significant Zodiac-British connection?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Friday, May 05, 2006 - 7:21 pm:   

On second thoughts, nevermind. It occurs to me that this is one of the aspects of the Zodiac case which is so agenda-driven as to be impossibly discussed objectively. Sorta like the cars Zodiac drove, or Dee's 'Frisco friends.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sandy
Username: Sandy

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 11, 2006 - 9:36 am:   

George, The British connection came from the Z's wording.it was thought he sounded as if he had a British background, (if I remember correctly).Of course suspect Kane's mother was English. I don't know about the others.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ed_neil
Username: Ed_neil

Registered: 5-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 11, 2006 - 2:26 pm:   

BTW, the British connection was suspected as early as August 1969. "Cipher Man A Briton?" appeared in the Vallejo News-Chronicle on 8-11-1969, p. 2. An unnamed woman who lived in Vallejo but was originally from Great Britain claimed that some words Z used were of British origin:

She cites the abbreviation "Fry" for Friday, the use of double letters on [sic] words such as "Christmass" and "coupples," and the expression "patterned," in describing a victim's pants, when the average American would use "flowered."

So, it's not a new theory, and it does have some evidence, however tenuous, to back it up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Johno
Username: Johno

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 11, 2006 - 9:08 pm:   

HHe does write in an unusual style.

- His use of the term "salt beef" which is what they often call corned beef in Britain.
- His frequent use of the term "I shall" and the word "shall" instead of will.
- His use of the term "nasty ones" and the word "nasty."
- His use of the term "great fun."
- His use of a pattern of more formal phrases like "searched the park properly", "holding road races", "wandering about town", "car drivers" and "the most delicious of pain."
- His affection for The Mikado by Britain's Sir W.S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan.
- His use of the term "blue meanies" as popularized in the animated film Yellow Submarine about the British band The Beatles.

Zodiac of course wasn't British since he had no British accent according to Bryan Hartnell who spoke with him for 15 minutes and the police dispatcher who took his call and Belli and Dunbar who took phone call from someone who claimed to be him. Unless he was an expert at faking an American accent.
He didn't write dates as the British do with the day, month and year but wrote them the standard American way of month, day and year.

It does seem like he has a pattern of using words in a British sense and an his interest in Gilbert and Sullivan leads me to wonder if his 'My name is.." is a further reference to Gilbert and Sullivan and their song "My name is John Wellington Wells" from their play "The Sorcerer."
Also I wonder if his "Slaves in Paradice" is somehow related to British author John Milton's epic poem "Paradice Lost."
He also uses Old English spelling from the 1600's like "howers" for hours, "woeman" for woman and the abbriviation "fry" from the Old English Fryday instead of Friday.

It just seems to me that Zodiac had some background in English Lit or at the least some extensive interest in it or some theatrical background which could tie in with his costume as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 3:05 am:   

Ok, thanks. This is a highly intelligent criminal, at least according to some, who is going to use British terminology while nestled in or quite near a major American city. (Until it can be otherwise proved, half the definite attacks occurred in Vallejo, the Vallejo papers are specifically mentioned in the early August letter (one of the best letters but one of the least discussed, as it shows that the Zodiac obviously was familiar with the make-out areas of Vallejo and hence Vallejo itself.)

No wonder some theorists like to present "possible" victims of geographically diverse locations; doing so helps draw attention away from Vallejo.

As for "fake clews," well, I guess we'll just have to take Zodiac's letters as proof positive - after all, we hang on his every, truthful word (excepting codes in one theorist's case) that there's an ingenious "British Connection." After all, he's a master criminal, what? (That final sentence is a quite "British" way of writing and speaking and it took me all of two seconds to employ it.)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 3:52 am:   

- His use of the term "salt beef" which is what they often call corned beef in Britain.

I've seen the phrase "salt beef" in America a hundred times. Do a Google search.

- His frequent use of the term "I shall" and the word "shall" instead of will.

This is extremely weak. Google again.

- His use of the term "nasty ones" and the word "nasty."

Such elementary words are seen in old, boring, "traditional" books and TV shows. Google it.

- His use of the term "great fun."

Once again, this is weak.

- His use of a pattern of more formal phrases like "searched the park properly", "holding road races", "wandering about town", "car drivers" and "the most delicious of pain."

Google. I've repeatedly heard many a full-fledged Americans who speak exactly the same way.

- His affection for The Mikado by Britain's Sir W.S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan.

The Mikado is the most popular operetta in the world and has been transferred into many, many languages. Google it.

- His use of the term "blue meanies" as popularized in the animated film Yellow Submarine about the British band The Beatles.

You can't be serious on this last point. If the Zodiac had parodied the yodeling in 'Hocus Pocus' by Focus in one of his letters would that be indicative of a "Dutch" connection?

It's interesting that "The Most Dangerous Game" was written by an American. (But it did take place on an island. There's that water connection again.)

Another explanation for a "British" connection, and the explanation I most like, is simply one of literacy. The more literate an American is, the more "British" he may sound. After all, what language do we speak? English. Oh, and why not an Austrailian connection, a New Zealand connection, a Canadian connection or a South African connection? They speak English too. In fact they speak it by the millions.

Having said all of that, there is one example posed which did cause me pause:

"- His use of a pattern of more formal phrases like "searched the park properly", "holding road races", "wandering about town", "car drivers" and "the most delicious of pain."

Well, one of them. "The most delicious of pain."

The others, "Searched the park properly." Gee, he didn't split an infinitive. He must be British. "Holding road races." Can you explain to me the "Britishness" of this statement? "Wandering about town." This I don't get. Are you suggesting that an American-educated person would have written "wandering around town?
"Car drivers." Johno, the very word "car" is hardly an English expression. I do find "the most delicious of pain" interesting, but considering how much time the Zodiac had to prepare all of his letters, the expression doesn't boldly stand out.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Douglas_oswell
Username: Douglas_oswell

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 6:49 am:   

"Delicious pain" is present in a Wordsworth poem titled "Sonnet on seeing Miss Helen Maria Williams Weep at a Tale of Distress":

SHE wept.--Life's purple tide began to flow
In languid streams through every thrilling vein;
Dim were my swimming eyes--my pulse beat slow,
And my full heart was swell'd to dear delicious pain.
Life left my loaded heart, and closing eye;
A sigh recall'd the wanderer to my breast;
Dear was the pause of life, and dear the sigh
That call'd the wanderer home, and home to rest.
That tear proclaims--in thee each virtue dwells,
And bright will shine in misery's midnight hour;
As the soft star of dewy evening tells
What radiant fires were drown'd by day's malignant pow'r,
That only wait the darkness of the night
To cheer the wand'ring wretch with hospitable light.
AXIOLOGUS

Given Zodiac's penchant for literary allusion, particularly in reference to such productions as Austin's "Agatha," I find this interesting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Vallejo_dave
Username: Vallejo_dave

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 28, 2006 - 9:00 am:   

I think more than his heart was swelled to dear delicious pain!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Johno
Username: Johno

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:13 pm:   

George,
You were too busy Googling to have absorbed the meaning of my post above.
I never said he was British. I said just the opposite, "Zodiac of course wasn't British."
My conclusion in his uses of all these phrases and words lumped together and not just the use of one or two is that "..Zodiac had some background in English Lit or at least some extensive interest in it or some theatrical background which could tie in with his costume as well."
If you want to line by line suggest I google search my train of thought than I would suggest to you to refute my last line because in it I am theororizing that Zodaic had some background in theater.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Douglas_oswell
Username: Douglas_oswell

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:04 pm:   

Johno, I couldn't agree with you more. He had "some kind of background in English Lit or at least some extensive interest in it." It's all about words with Zodiac, and he's particularly keen on literary allusion.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wrecknball
Username: Wrecknball

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:44 pm:   

Z, while in the military, could have been stationed in Britain and thus adopted pieces of the language.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Bold text Italics Underline Create a hyperlink Insert a clipart image

Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Post as "Anonymous"
Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration