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Tom_voigt
Username: Tom_voigt

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Wednesday, October 25, 2006 - 8:56 am:   

Continued from here.
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Sandy
Username: Sandy

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, October 29, 2006 - 7:48 pm:   

One of my faves was in Young Frankinstein, when Elizabeth (Madeline Kahan)Sings: OHHHH sweet mystery of life at last I've found you. ( I had a boyfriend who loved to hear me sing it the same way she did ).
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Sandy
Username: Sandy

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Sunday, October 29, 2006 - 7:59 pm:   

Well I just tried to post but somehow it did'nt so here it is again. One of my faves was in Young Frankinstein, when Elizabeth ( Madeline Kahn )sings: Ohhh sweet mystery of life at last I've found you. (I had a boyfriend who loved to hear me sing it the same way she did).
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Jim_t
Username: Jim_t

Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Monday, October 30, 2006 - 3:19 pm:   

I liked the line from the "Waterboy" were the waterboy tells his mother about his girlfriend and he says "I like Vicki Mama, and she's my girlfriend" he leaves and comes back and says "and I like her boobies too, and she showed them to me!"
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George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Tuesday, October 31, 2006 - 2:36 am:   

The ancient (but at least Technicolor) 1937 film "Nothing Sacred" has line after memorable line, most of them aimed at the newspaper business in general. One memorable exchange occurrs when Frederic March, a major NYC reporter, attempts not to behave like one while in a small Vermont town.

He's searching for Hazel Flagg, who is supposedly dying, in order to exploit the story of her brave battle against "radium poisoning." March enters the office of the only doctor the town has, in search of Hazel Flagg. After twenty seconds of talking, the doctor, shaving, suddenly faces March with stony comtempt.

Dr. Downer: "You know what? You know what I think young fella? I think you're a newspaper man. I can smell 'em. Excuse me while I open the window."

(Continues talking as window is opened and without being asked - a deliberately acted New England stereotype - offers other thoughts.)

Downer: "I'll tell you briefly what I think of newspapermen: the hand of God reaching into the mire couldn't elevate one of them to the depths of degradation. Not by a million miles."

March: "I think you're being a little severe toward my profession. Not much, just a little."

Downer: "And you're from New York, eh? I don't suppose you've heard of a paper called The Morning Star?

March: "You have the honor, Dr. Downer, of addressing that newspaper's most gifted representative."

Downer: "Moses in the mountains! You're from The Morning Star. (Downer goes on to explain how he was cheated out of that paper's prize for a long ago contest.)

Downer: "I entered that contest with a clean pair of hands, young man. I explained who the three greatest American's are and proved it-- writing on one side of the paper."

March: "Be reasonable, Dr. Downer. You can't harbor a grudge for years."

Downer: "I'll habror it 'til I die! Wait and see!"

March: "I appeal to you as a man of learning, Dr. Downer. An old contest like that. Are you sure you deserved the first prize?"

Downer, ignoring March's question: "The Morning Star had its chance to win back my respect years ago but when you've been robbed, swindeled and cheated for years, it's pardonable to formulate an opinion. Did the paper even try to save its face by offering me one of the lesser prizes? No, not that gang of chicken thieves!"

March, mumbling his way out of the office: "I could do better in darkest Africa." Naturally, as soon as he exits, he runs into Hazel Flagg, the young woman dying of "radium poisoning" who March was seeking all along.

This film is hilarious and lives up to its title. Unfortunately, the one-liners in the picture need to be seen in context for maximum impact, as do scenes like the one outlined above. Especially two scenarios in the office of character actor Walter Connely, who plays the harried editor of the paper and is March's boss. It's a unique film, written by Ben Hecht at his prime. Highly recommended but not for those who drink at the well of political correctness. Lots of negative stereotypes in the film, all of them funny. I don't think they missed one group to make sport of. (And Carole Lombard has never been more ravishing.)
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George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 01, 2006 - 4:01 am:   

"In Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, bloodshed--they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love, five hundred years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock."
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George
Username: George

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Wednesday, November 01, 2006 - 4:16 am:   

"By this time the whole joint was jumping; cops, reporters, passers-by. As much hoop-de-doo as we get in Los Angeles when they open a supermarket."
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Scott_ben
Username: Scott_ben

Registered: 7-2006
Posted on Thursday, November 02, 2006 - 10:15 am:   

George,

I love that line from "The Third Man" as well.
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Vallejo_dave
Username: Vallejo_dave

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 21, 2006 - 7:58 am:   

"Get away from me you filthy, stinking ape." CH
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Tommyt
Username: Tommyt

Registered: 4-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 06, 2007 - 12:48 pm:   

"You know, my uncle once had this plow horse. It was a really good plow horse. Anyway, one day, the horse came up lame and the vet offered to put him down. You know what my uncle said? Why would I let somebody else kill a horse that belongs to me."

Robert Redford, Spy Game

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